Tag Archives: ICPSR

U.S. County-Level Natality and Mortality Data, 1915-2007

Another new release from ICPSR that is too interesting not to mention.  The U.S. County-Level Natality and Mortality Data, 1915-2007 has nearly a century of detailed data on births and infant deaths for those looking for long-term patterns.

 

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National Crime Victimization Survey, Concatenated File, 1992-2015

The National Crime Victimization Survey is published every year, but the Concatenated File 1992-2015 allows easy multi-year comparisons of data.  From ICPSR, try it out!

High School Longitudinal Study

I am not regularly posting about interesting datasets as much as I used to.  But this High School Longitudinal Study [2009-2013] from ICPSR is fascinating, dealing as it does with the following questions:

  • How do parents, teachers, counselors, and students construct choice sets for students, and how are these related to students’ characteristics, attitudes, and behavior?
  • How do students select among secondary school courses, postsecondary institutions, and possible careers?
  • How do parents and students plan financing for postsecondary experiences? What sources inform these plans?
  • What factors influence students’ decisions about taking STEM courses and following through with STEM college majors? Why are some students underrepresented in STEM courses and college majors?
  • How students’ plans vary over the course of high school and how decisions in 9th grade impact students’ high school trajectories. When students are followed up in the spring of 11th grade and later, their planning and decision-making in 9th grade may be linked to subsequent behavior.

Subscribe to announcements from ICPSR to learn about more datasets and resources like this.

Historical Urban Ecological Data – Lead?

Historical Urban Ecological Data, 1830-1930, is a dataset available from ICPSR.  With lead contamination now in the news in Newark, NJ as well as Flint, MI, this may be a timely resource.

The HUE data covers seven cities (Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, Manhattan, and Philadelphia) for the years 1830 to 1930 and provides detailed disease reports by location, and includes in-street sewer and water sanitation systems.  Pretty good bet those were lead pipes.

Transatlantic Trends Survey, 2010

The Transatlantic Trends Survey, 2010 aims to identify the attitudes of the public in the United States and in 12 European countries towards foreign policy and transatlantic issues. This survey concentrated on issues such as: United States and European Union (EU) leadership and relations, international relations, the likelihood of strong leadership from the United States, the EU, Russia, China, and India five years from now, respondent assessment of the current United States President on various issues such as climate change and stabilizing Afghanistan, which issues should be priorities for United States and EU leaders in the next five years, favorability towards certain countries and institutions, international cooperation, international conflict, the role of China in international issues, Turkey and Turkish accession to the EU, the international economic crisis, economic versus military power, Turkey and Cyprus reunification, political party attachment, vote intentions in the next national elections, and left-right political self-placement. Demographic and other background information includes age, gender, race, age when finished full-time education and stage at which full-time education completed, occupation, type of phone line, household composition, type of locality, and region of residence.

Global Views 2010: American Public Opinion and Foreign Policy

Global Views 2010: American Public Opinion and Foreign Policy  is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public on matters related to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. This public opinion study of the United States focused on respondents’ opinions of the United States’ leadership role in the world and the challenges the country faces domestically and internationally. Many topics are covered.

Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database, 2009

Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database, 2009 is a comprehensive, up-to-date database of inter-related sources of CCDF policy information that support the needs of a variety of audiences through (1) Analytic Data Files and (2) a Book of Tables. These are made available to researchers, administrators, and policymakers with the goal of addressing important questions concerning the effects of alternative child care subsidy policies and practices on the children and families served, specifically parental employment and self-sufficiency, the availability and quality of care, and children’s development.
It provides information at the state and local level.

National Inmate Survey

The National Inmate Survey 2007 is available. The survey is comprised of two questionnaires — a survey of sexual victimization and a survey of past drug and alcohol use and abuse.

Assessing Happiness and Competitiveness of World Major Metropolises, 2006

Assessing Happiness and Competitiveness of World Major Metropolises, 2006 empirically examines happiness and community/city conditions assessed by residents living in ten major cities of the world: Beijing, Berlin, London, Milan, New York City, Paris, Seoul, Stockholm, Tokyo, and Toronto. Respondents were asked questions about themselves and their city of residence. Questions focused on a range of topics including the economy, culture and education, welfare, safety, environment, living conditions, city administration, community life, health, and happiness. Demographic questions included city of residence, gender, age, education level, income level, occupation, marital status, and religion.

Crime in Boomburb Cities

Crime in Boomburb Cities: 1970-2004 focused on the effect of economic resources and racial/ethnic composition on the change in crime rates from 1970-2004 in United States cities in metropolitan areas that experienced a large growth in population after World War II. A total of 352 cities in the following United States metropolitan areas were selected for this study: Atlanta, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Las Vegas, Miami, Orange County, Orlando, Phoenix, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Silicon Valley (Santa Clara), and Tampa/St. Petersburg. Selection was based on the fact that these areas developed during a similar time period and followed comparable development trajectories. In particular, these 14 areas, known as the “boomburbs” for their dramatic, post-World War II population growth, all faced issues relating to the rapid growth of tract-style housing and the subsequent development of low density, urban sprawls. The study combined place-level data obtained from the United States Census with crime data from the Uniform Crime Reports for five categories of Type I crimes: aggravated assaults, robberies, murders, burglaries, and motor vehicle thefts. The dataset contains a total of 247 variables pertaining to crime, economic resources, and race/ethnic composition.